Is ATAP still the Government’s plan?

With our release of the Congestion Free Network 2 it’s interesting to think about what the government’s position on it is. Especially so given we think the government, through the NZTA, should be tasked with delivering it, just like they deliver most of the strategic road network (mainly the motorways).…
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Submit on the roadsfest draft GPS

Submissions on the draft Government Policy Statement (GPS) close at 5pm today. We discussed this document when it was first released back in late February, and to be honest we were not very impressed by it. The GPS is a really important document in guiding our approach to transport in New Zealand, as it sets key priority areas and broad “funding bands” for how NZTA spends over $3 billion of public money raised every year from fuel taxes, road user charges and vehicle licensing fees.…
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Govt silly to reject Regional Fuel Tax

Last Thursday Finance Minister Steven Joyce announced that the government was “ruling out” using a regional fuel tax as one way to fill the $4 billion transport funding gap that was identified by ATAP. He noted a few reasons for this decision: And second, I stress that we are not interested in introducing a regional fuel tax.…
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Agreeing with Joyce

Last week Finance Minister Steven Joyce gave a speech to Massey University and Auckland Chamber of Commerce about the economy and this year’s budget. There were some notable elements related to transport in it worth highlighting, especially those in relation to demand management.…
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Exports, prosperity, and cities

What does New Zealand do to pay its way, in the global context? And what could it do differently? These are an important questions because New Zealand is a small, trade-exposed country. We produce some of the things that we need locally, but many other things must be imported, which means that we need to export something in return.…
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Sunday Reading 12 February 2017

Welcome back to Sunday reading. From the Devonport Ferry. If your commute has tourists taking selfies on it then I’d say it’s probably pretty good: Devonport Ferry ©Patrick Reynolds 2017 Here is a clipping from yesterday’s Herald Commercial Property section. It neatly encapsulates the value of sorting out planning restrictions [Unitary Plan] and making high quality Transit investments [City Rail Link], naturally, given the context, through a property value lens:I wouldn’t get too hung up on the salesman’s boosterism in the second paragraph, as the main point is that the only way for tatty low value (in the broadest sense) parts of the city, like the current low rise commercial city fringe, to attract investment and therefore improvement is through value uplift.…
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