Flashback Saturday: If you want more consumption choices, live near lots of other people

Every weekend we dig into the archives. This post by Peter was originally published in March 2015. One of the many reasons that people choose to live in cities is that cities offer variety. As Stu Donovan has argued before, being around more people sometimes seems inconvenient, but it also exposes you to new ideas, new people, and new consumption choices.…
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Flashback Saturday: Demographia fails Urban Economics 101

Every weekend we dig into the archives. This post by Peter was originally published in March 2015. Every year since 2005, pro-sprawl think-tank Demographia has published a new edition of its “International Housing Affordability Survey“. They report a “median multiple” measure of housing affordability that compares median house prices to median household incomes within a number of cities, mostly in the English-speaking world.…
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Flashback Saturday: The demographics of travel to work

Every weekend we dig into the archives. This by post Matt was originally published in March 2015. The last census was two years ago and there’s already been a lot of analysis of the results of it. In terms of transport the census asks about Journeys to Work and while it is a fairly flawed metric due to it ignoring other trip generators like journeys to education – a large component of the morning peak in particular – it still has shown some interesting results.…
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Flashback Saturday: Proximity and Integration (The Metropolitan Revolution)

Every weekend we dig into the archives. This post by Kent was originally published in May 2014.  Our open, innovative economy increasingly craves proximity and extols integration, which allows knowledge to be transferred easily between, within, and across clusters, firms, workers and supporting institutions, thereby enabling the creation of new ideas that fuel even greater economic activity and growth.…
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Flashback Saturday: How transport policy affects location choice

Each weekend we dig into the archives. This post by Stu was first published in September 2017. When we talk about transport, it’s natural for our minds to focus on moving people from A to B. That is, we tend to think about how to meet the demand for travel between locations, assuming that the demand for being in those locations is unaffected by the transport policies that we implement.…
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Flashback Saturday: Alain Bertaud in Auckland

Every weekend we dig into the archives. This post by Peter was originally published in September 2014. Back in July former World Bank urban planner Alain Bertaud and his wife Marie-Agnes, a fellow professional in the field, came down to New Zealand at the invitation of the NZ Initiative and the Minister of Finance’s office to deliver a series of talks on urban economics.…
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